Methods: Geochemistry

Methods: Geochemistry

Cemeteries are not only places where the dead are buried, they are ritual landscapes where several different activities related to commemoration of the dead can take place. This may include preparing the body, building burial pyres, and performing various rituals. Sampling of archaeological deposits with a handheld push probe across the site allows us to investigate a much larger area than would be possible using only excavation.  Sediment samples are also taken from excavation contexts for later multi-chemical analysis. All samples are characterized based on color, texture and inclusions, and tested for levels of available phosphate (Pav), pH, and magnetic susceptibility. Since fire and ash increase the magnetic susceptibility and pH…

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Methods: Computed Tomography

Methods: Computed Tomography

Cremation urns from Békés Jégvermi-kert are sometimes first scanned using x-ray computerized tomography (CT) at a clinic in the Department of Radiology at the University of Szeged (with thanks to Dr. András Palkó, above). CT scans of cremation urns are useful as guides for micro-excavation, as they allow artifacts, bone positions, and sometimes even stratigraphy, to be known before we attempt recovery. Even more important, because cremated bone further fragments during excavation, CT permits measuring critical elements of intact bones before removal, improving chances of assigning sex, age categories and minimum number of individuals, as well as identifying pathologies.

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Methods: Microexcavation

Methods: Microexcavation

Differences in the funerary practice of cremation can be detected by excavation of burial urns in 2 centimeter spits and measuring the weight and proportion of cremated remains by anatomical regions according to stratigraphic deposition.  Close attention to stratigraphy, heat treatment, and duplications of the same bone, inform us about whether the same pyre was used for many individuals from which the second burial was collected or whether multiple individuals were placed in the urn intentionally. View a video to see an example of micro-excavation with a reflectorless total station (and note that music accompanies the video):

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Methods: Petrography

Methods: Petrography

Petrographic analysis of ceramic thin sections involves taking slices of a ceramic vessel and looking at it through a light microscope. Production technologies such as ceramic manufacture are highly resistant to change, and different clay preparation techniques and particles can be identified in the walls of a sherd. These differences vary over regions and potting traditions, and and changes in production technologies are thus a good indicator of migration.

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Methods: Photogrammetry

Methods: Photogrammetry

Photogrammetry is the use of photography to derive the geometric properties of objects. Individual graves are photographed between 40 and 100 times from different angles and photographs are then dropped into a photogrammetry program. The software creates a 3D model of the object photographed, and this object is then tied into the excavation grid using survey points shot in with the on-site electronic theodolite. Download a 3D rendering of a burial here: HB_09 (pdf). A blank page will come up – choose to “Save As.” You must have a PDF reader such as Adobe Acrobat to manipulate the object. The model was made by Giles Morrow at the University of Toronto, and was…

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Methods

Methods

Bringing together specialists and students from around the world, the BAKOTA team draws upon an array of methods as we collect and analyze our data. Learn more about some of these methods… Surface Collection  Shovel Testing  Magnetometry, EM & Resistivity Osteology  Ancient DNA  Geochemistry Computed Tomography  Microexcavation  Petrography  Photogrammetry  

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Directors and Mentors

Directors and Mentors

The BAKOTA team during the June 2013 excavations. Gábor Bácsmegi is an Archaeologist at the Munkácsy Mihály Museum in Békéscsaba.  He specializes in the reconstruction of ancient environments and the Neolithic of southeastern Europe. Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea  is a Toronto-based digital media and animation instructor at OCAD and Brock University. He specializes in computer animation, installation, and drawing. His work has been exhibited across Canada and internationally. Webpage:www.gustavocerquera.com Paul R. Duffy is Canadian Co-Director, and founder of the BAKOTA project. He is a Research Associate at the Field Museum in Chicago and lectures at the University of Toronto. He specializes in the European Bronze Age, spatial analysis, and sociocultural change in middle-range societies….

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Field School

Field School

The Bronze Age Körös Off-Tell Archaeological (BAKOTA) Field School: Undergraduate Training in Fieldwork and Independent Research Reporting in European Archaeology is a summer program sponsored by Quinnipiac University and the National Science Foundation’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates Site program (Award N0. 1460820). We are not currently offering a field school Please check out the NSF-REU website for other summer research opportunities. BAKOTA mentor Dr. Jaime Ullinger (with Dr. Lesley Gregoricka) just announced a new bioarchaeology themed NSF-REU! You can find out more info here!  Questions? Feel free to contact one of the BAKOTA project directors: Paul Duffy, Ph.D., American co-director (paul.duffy@utoronto.ca) Julia Giblin, Ph.D., American co-director (Julia.Giblin@quinnipiac.edu) Györgyi Parditka, M.A.,…

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Közel negyven sírt tártak fel a Jégvermi kertben

Közel negyven sírt tártak fel a Jégvermi kertben

This newspaper article describes research at the Jégvermi-kert site during an interview with BAKOTA Hungarian co-director Györgyi Parditka and Lászlo Paja.

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Digging Deep

Digging Deep

An article about Quinnipiac students Justine Tynan and Lauren Tosti and their work on the BAKOTA project.

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